Category Archives: R

Prices rising, choice declining for 2016 Obamacare

Data released yesterday at healthcare.gov shows the beginnings of an adverse selection death spiral that threatens the stability of the system of insurance created by the Affordable Care Act.  The data shows that, on plans using the “federally facilitated marketplace” created under the ACA, PPO plans that continued from 2015 to 2016 increased gross premiums an average of 16% and Gold and Platinum plans increased 15% and 21% respectively.  HMO plans, by contrast, increased a lesser 8% and Bronze and Silver Plans increased a lesser 12% and 9% respectively.  We should thus expect to see in 2016 relatively fewer people purchasing plans that give them a greater choice in physicians or that provide greater protection against medical expenses.

The tables below summarize the big picture.  The first table shows the mean change in gross premiums between 2015 and 2016 for plans that persisted over that timespan when grouped by metal level.  As one can see the more generous Gold and Platinum plans increased at rates considerably higher than the less generous Catastrophic, Bronze and Silver plans.

MetalLevel percent change
1 Bronze 12.1
2 Catastrophic 8.1
3 Gold 15.2
4 Silver 9.4
5 Platinum 20.9
mean change in premiums between 2015 and 2016 for 6,699 persistent plans

The second table shows the mean change in premiums between 2015 and 2016 for plans that persisted over that timespan when grouped by plan type.  As one can see the PPO plan, which offers the greatest choice of doctor, increased at a higher rate than other types of plans.  EPOs, which are similar to HMOs but restrict visits to specialists less, increased in gross premiums at a rate far higher than HMOs.

PlanType percent change
1 POS 12.3
2 HMO 8.3
3 EPO 12.2
4 PPO 16.5
mean change in premiums between 2015 and 2016 for 6,699 persistent plans

The third table combines the first two and shows, for each combination of metal level and plan type, the mean percentage increase in gross premiums between 2015 and 2016.

MetalLevel HMO EPO POS PPO
1 Catastrophic 1.9 5.8 6.9 14.8
2 Bronze 11.2 10.9 12.0 16.2
3 Silver 5.8 8.8 12.5 14.5
4 Gold 9.4 16.6 17.1 19.7
5 Platinum 12.2 25.6 7.5 25.9
mean change in premiums between 2015 and 2016 for 6,699 persistent plans

Premium increases are only part of the story, however.  Some types of plans are not available at any price any longer.  The table below shows the percentage of rating areas in 2015 and 2016 containing each type of plan.  Notice that the percent of rating areas containing any PPO has dropped significantly between 2015 and 2016; HMOs and POS plans have dropped as well, though EPO plans have become more prevalent.

PlanType AVG2015 AVG2016
1 HMO 92.6 88.6
2 EPO 78.3 82.5
3 POS 83.7 75.4
4 PPO 92.5 76.7
percent of rating areas having at least one of these plan types

We can also consider the prevalence of competition. The table below shows the percentage of rating areas in 2015 and 2016 containing at least two of each type of plan. Notice that with PPOs, the percentage of rating areas with competition has declined, although it has increased somewhat for HMOs, EPOs and POS plans.

PlanType AVG2015 AVG2016
1 HMO 71.3 72.5
2 EPO 66.5 74.0
3 POS 48.2 50.6
4 PPO 76.0 61.0
percent of rating areas having at least two of these plan types

The same analysis can be done on the metal levels of the plans available.  The table immediately below shows for 2015 and 2016  the percentage of rating areas in which there is at least one plan of the specified metal level.  Platinum plans have declined sharply in prevalence since 2015.  Now only just over half of the rating areas have even a single platinum plan available even if one were willing and able to pay the higher premiums.

MetalLevel AVG2015 AVG2016
1 Catastrophic 74.3 72.2
2 Bronze 91.8 88.1
3 Silver 91.1 89.7
4 Gold 90.9 88.5
5 Platinum 92.7 53.2
percent of rating areas having at least one of these metal levels

When it comes to competition, the picture is even worse for platinum plans.  In only about a third of the rating areas can one choose between platinum plans.

MetalLevel AVG2015 AVG2016
1 Catastrophic 33.5 30.3
2 Bronze 82.5 82.4
3 Silver 85.7 84.6
4 Gold 73.0 73.4
5 Platinum 44.9 34.6
percent of rating areas having at least two of these metal levels

Finally, since it seems to be the PPO plans whose prevalence is declining most, we can show the extent of that prevalence according to the metal level of the plan. The table below shows that the Platinum PPOs, the plan probably most helpful to the chronically ill that the ACA was supposed to help greatly, is diminish significantly in prevalence but that Gold and Silver PPOs are diminishing as well

PlanType MetalLevel AVG2015 AVG2016
1 PPO Catastrophic 85.8 71.1
2 PPO Bronze 94.9 81.6
3 PPO Silver 94.9 81.6
4 PPO Gold 94.9 81.6
5 PPO Platinum 89.5 53.5
percent of rating areas having at least one of these Platinum plan types

Conclusion

The data shows that platinum plans and PPO plans are shrinking in prevalence and that the gross premiums for such plans are going up. One might say that this development is not so awful since it leaves in place a market for more basic plans: HMO plans for example or silver and gold plans.  Perhaps the government should not be subsidizing individual’s choice of doctors or fostering plans, such as platinum plans, that fail to deter excess medical consumption.  Such is not, however, the promise of the ACA or, I suspect, the desires of many of its proponents.

Moreover, we are in a dynamic situation.  Think about next year when the insurer subsidies are supposed to disappear and when the chronically ill people who were in platinum and/or PPO plans migrate into the next best thing, a gold plan or, if one is available, a POS or EPO plan.  Suddenly those plans become vulnerable to adverse selection pressures.  And for 2017 we might thus expect to see yet further shrinkage of PPO and platinum plans and greater pressures on everything but the basic Bronze and Silver HMO plans.  When that happens, the adverse selection death spiral will not only start biting wealthier purchases or those with chronic conditions, but mainstream America. Private health insurance is fragile. It generally does not well withstand the sort of underwriting regulation imposed by the ACA.  The conceit of the ACA proponents was that they had engineered a system — the “three legged stool” so strong that it could resist the almost invariable pressures of adverse selection.  If I am right, and regardless what one thinks about the motives of those proponents, we are beginning to see that the engineering was just not good enough.

Caveats and further research

The computations shown above are based on the number of plans and not weighted by the number of enrollees.  This is largely of necessity since the federal government has not been releasing enrollment figure by plan in a clear way (although it may be possible to tease the figures out of rate review submissions filed and collated on healthcare.gov).  Although enrollment weighting will likely decrease the average mean premium (less expensive policies tend to be purchased more), it is not clear that enrollment weighting will have much effect on relative premium increases.

The figures are also not computed yet on a state-by-state basis, something that I hope to present in a later post.  They also contain only data for states whose plans are described in material available at healthcare.gov.  Data for states such as California and New York, which have their own exchanges, is not included here and might alter the numbers somewhat.

Finally, I present gross premiums here; as I have discussed at length elsewhere, net premium increases may well be higher, particularly where the purchaser wishes to retain a gold or platinum plan or a PPO plan whose premiums are rising even faster than those of the silver plans and the second lowest silver plan. The situation is worst where, due to some willingness on the part of a new entrant to take risk,  the second lowest silver plan drops in price, thereby decreasing subsidy levels, but other silver, gold and platinum plans increase in price.

Note

Programming for this work was done in R using data from data.healthcare.gov and is available on request from the author. Packages used include data.table, tidyR, htmlTable and dplyr. There is a lot more work to be done mining these databases.

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Comparable SHOP policies are more expensive than individual ones: Why?

One of the ideas behind employee group policies and one of the purported virtues of employer sponsored health insurance is that the marketing and other overhead costs are lower.  Instead of selling 200 policies to 200 persons, the insurer sells one policy to an employer.  And one reason employer sponsored health insurance has often been supposed to be lower priced than comparable individual policies is that individuals who are gainfully employed tend not to have at least some of the expensive chronic or acute conditions such as certain forms of cancer or serious heart disease.

These assumptions predict that if one looks at policies sold in the individual exchange and the SHOP exchange under the Affordable Care Act that are sold in the same county, from the same issuer, have the same marketing name, have the same metal level, the same plan type (PPO, HMO, etc.), the same deductible and the same out-of-pocket limit, the SHOP premiums should on balance be lower than the individual premiums.  Apples to apples, they should at least be no higher. Indeed, lower potential premiums are one of the key reasons for the existence of SHOP exchanges.

When I examine the data available from healthcare.gov, however,  I find that the opposite is true.

SHOP policies are on average 8% more expensive than  apparently identical individual policies.

That’s the key finding.  The rest of this post tries to figure out why this might be the case. I’ll tell you the statistical ground I traversed in this effort. But I will confess that at the end of the day I am not quite sure why it is that SHOP premiums sure appear to be higher.

It’s not a matter of outliers skewing the mean.  The median premium ratio between comparable SHOP and individual ratios  — the “SHOP/individual ratio” — is 1.08. 10% of the comparable policies are more than 21% more expensive on the SHOP exchange. And even the lowest 10% are just 2% cheaper on the SHOP exchange than on the individual exchange.

The figure below shows the distribution of SHOP/individual ratios among the 12,689 comparable policies in the dataset. As can readily be seen, most policies are more expensive on the SHOP exchange. (A SHOP/individual ratio greater than 1 means that the median SHOP policy was more expensive than the median comparable individual policy).

nationwidePremiumRatioHistogram

Breaking down the data to gain insight

The state in which the policy was sold and the issuer might affect the SHOP/individual ratio.  Unfortunately the effects of these potentially separate variables are extremely to tease apart because no issuer sold in more than one state.   The table to the left shows the results. It shows significant variation in median SHOP/individual ratios across the combination of issuer and state.   On the top end, Minuteman Health,  which sells in New Hampshire has a ratio of 1.31 and Health Alliance Medical Plans, which sells in Illinois has a ratio of 1.25 Montana Health CO-OP has a ratio of 1.2. On the bottom end, CommunityCare, which sells in Oklahoma has a ratio of 0.76 and CoOpportunity Care, which sells in Iowa, has a ratio of 0.86.

 

StateIssuermedianRatio

The best I can do to tease out whether it is the state in which the policy is being sold or the issuer in the state that is responsible for the variation is to look at those states in which all  the issuers have SHOP/individual ratios greater than the median of 1.08 and none have a lower one.  Two states show up: Montana and Texas.  This suggests some regulatory issue or special market condition in those two states that is leading SHOP premiums to be unusually high or individual premiums to be unusually low.  Unfortunately, the finding is not particularly robust and I will confess to having little idea what this special factor might be.

We can see if the metal level and the plan type end up affecting the SHOP/individual ratio once the issuer and state are controlled for.   Multivariate linear regression shows the impact of Metal Level and Plan Type to be quite small.  The greatest effect was shown by POS plans, which reduced the SHOP/individual ratio by 0.03.  Everything else had a smaller effect. Basically, SHOP plans tend to be more expensive than comparable individual market plans without regard to metal level or plan type.

An adverse selection theory?

Let me at least explore one other reason SHOP premiums might generally be higher.  There are several buffers against adverse selection — the proclivity of persons with accurate knowledge of higher risk to select greater amounts of insurance coverage — in the individual market.  A key one of these are the premium subsidies, which mean that many individuals, even those of relatively low risk, pay less for insurance than their expected cost of health care. There’s the individual mandate that likewise coaxes individuals, even those of low relative risk, to purchase insurance.  There’s an open enrollment period. An individual can’t easily wait until they get sick and then by insurance in the middle of the year.  In theory, they only can purchase insurance outside of the open enrollment window if they qualify for “special enrollment” by virtue of a small set of non-medical changes in their life circumstances.

The SHOP market may be more vulnerable to adverse selection problems.  There’s no employer mandate that applies to small employers that tend to be eligible for SHOP policies. Although there are some tax credit subsidies, they tend to be less lavish than those bestowed on individuals and they apply only to some small employers.  For other small employers there really aren’t any of the sort of “special deals” that might make it a good deal for even those whose employees and dependents are low risk. Finally there is no limited open enrollment period. On the contrary,  under 45 C.F.R. § 155.725(b), “[t]he SHOP must permit a qualified employer to purchase coverage for its small group at any point during the year. ”  Thus, an employer can wait until someone they care about — say the CEO’s daughter — gets really sick and then decide it would be prudent to have a employee group health plan.

What we may be seeing in the SHOP exchanges is an insurance world in which even the mild protections against adverse selection contained on the individual exchanges do not exist.  And the result is predictable: higher prices and very few buyers.

Conclusion

So, what do we do with this finding?  What do we do about the fact that SHOP policies tend to priced higher than comparable individual ones?  Standing by itself, I am not sure one can draw much of an affirmative policy implication out of the result, particularly where we don’t yet have a good handle on causation.  I do think it argues for thinking about imposing some adverse selection controls — such as limited open enrollment periods — if we are going to keep SHOP alive.

I also think, however, that the findings disclosed here have kind of a rebuttal value.  They mean that proponents of SHOP exchanges should have a difficult time grounding an argument to preserve that additional complexity of Obamacare on grounds that it saves money. Although there are, to be sure, exceptions, and although there may be other reasons to induce small employers to purchase health insurance for their employees, right now it does not look as if the price is right.

 

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