Tag Archives: section 1341

How The Obama Administration Raided The Treasury To Pay Off Insurers

As discussed earlier, I have moved most of my blogging on the Affordable Care Act over to Forbes blog site: The Apothecary.  Here’s where you can find my latest entry.  It’s about Obama administration lawlessness in running the Transitional Reinsurance program.

Here are a few paragraphs to whet your interest.  To see more, go here.

This is about a raid conducted in the murky twilight of the Federal Register. It’s a scheme in which the Obama administration collected less in taxes from health insurers (mostly off the Exchanges) than they were required to do under the Affordable Care Act, created a plan to pay insurers selling policies on the Exchange considerably more than originally projected, and stiffed the United States Treasury on the money it was supposed to receive from the taxes. It’s a different bailout than the Risk Corridors program. That, at least, was originally authorized by statute.  This is about a diversion that took place in spite of a statute that explicitly prohibited it.  And the consequence of the diversion of funds was to enrich insurers and, probably, to keep more insurers selling policies on the Exchanges than would otherwise be the case.

The transitional reinsurance program as implemented, however, has become entirely unmoored from the statute that created it. It has instead embarked on a progressively stranger course in which two of the most recent diversions were  underassessing health insurers to pay for the program and then using the first $2 billion collected not to pay the United States Treasury as called for by the statute but instead to pay off insurers selling individual health insurance policies on the Exchange and, some times, off the Exchange.  Indeed, not only has $2 billion from the 2014 money been diverted from the Treasury to insurers but it looks as if at least an additional $800 million from the 2015 money is heading in the same direction.

By combining the two revisions of the original reinsurance parameters, the Obama administration made the program about 40% juicier for insurers . To the cynical eye, this could be seen as one of several administrative cures for the Obama administration’s politically understandable yet completely illegal decision to starve exchange insurers of potential customers who would now, by administrative fiat, often be permitted to keep those dreadful policies that the Affordable Care Act was supposed to eliminate. With foolish campaign promises as the motivation, one illegality begat another.

And now let’s take a closer look at the Obama administration’s legal justification for shoveling money to insurance companies on whose graces the success of Obamacare rests . You can read it above.  CMS contended that, because the statute was silent or ambiguous; it gave CMS discretion.  According to CMS, the statute used “shall” when it came to the $10 million to be collected for reinsurers in 2014 and used only “reflects” when it came to the $2 million for the Treasury, implying that the collection of money for reinsurers was more mandatory than collection of money for Treasury. Besides, argued CMS, the premium “stabilization” purpose of the ACA would be enhanced by funneling more money to insurance companies.

This reading of the statute makes no sense, however. The ambiguity exists only by virtue of ignoring a provision of the statute never even mentioned by CMS its legal analysis. By sending out a specific bill to health insurers and third party administrators to cover the Treasury payments, CMS had clearly collected money under the program in part pursuant to section 1341(b)(3)(B)(iv), the part that requires $5 billion for Treasury.  Look at paragraph (b)(4): “Notwithstanding the preceding sentence, any contribution amounts described in paragraph (3)(B)(iv) shall be deposited into the general fund of the Treasury of the United States and may not be used for the program established under this section.” But this diversion of funds collected for the Treasury into the hands of the insurers was precisely what CMS now purported to find justification for in the language of the statute.  CMS’s argument is particularly strange given the“miscellaneous receipts statute” which says that agencies generally can’t just keep money they collect; rather they must “deposit the money in the Treasury as soon as practicable without deduction for any charge or claim.”

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