The Risk Corridor Calculator: How the government plans to use fictitious profits to shovel more money to insurers

Snapshot of the Risk Corridor Calculator

Snapshot of the Risk Corridor Calculator

This is a different kind of blog entry.  There isn’t going to be too much text here. Instead, I want to direct you to a spreadsheet I created (The Risk Corridors Calculator) available on Google Docs and the first (click here to watch it on YouTube) of two videos I’ll be making that explain

(1) how Risk Corridors work under the regulations originally proposed by the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS)

(2) how the insurance industry could lose money notwithstanding Risk Corridors as a result of President Obama changing his mind and conditionally permitting certain insurers for one year to “uncancel” certain  policies that the Affordable Care Act would otherwise have have prohibited starting in 2014; and

(3) how the proposed revisions to the Risk Corridor regulations will shovel money to many insurers and could put them back in the same position they would have been had President Obama not changed his mind.

[Note from 8:32 a.m. 12/6/2014: I discovered a small error in the Risk Corridors Calculator. It has been fixed.  It does not affect anything essential in this blog. Unfortunately, I will need to conform the video to the Calculator, which is likely not to happen until later today. So, if you watch the video today, it is conceptually fine, but just be aware that one of the formulas was off.]

In essence, however, the proposed HHS regulations impute fictitious “profits” to insurers that they then get to subtract from their net premiums.  As a result, it will look to the Risk Corridors program as if the insurer is losing more money in an Exchange plan and therefore entitled to greater government assistance.  (The government has now acknowledged that, although the Congressional Budget Office scored it as costing nothing, Risk Corridors need not be budget neutral.) Another way of thinking about the proposal is that it creates phantom costs that affect the apparent (though not the real) profitability of the insurer and then shovels money to insurers based in part on those phantom costs. It is little different than the government insisting that the insurer lost money due to claims that it actually did not pay and is therefore entitled — even under a formula that is formally unchanged — to greater payments from the government.  Viewed yet another way, it is almost as if the proposed regulations treat what President Obama did as a “tort,” and remedy the wrong by licensing the aggrieved insurers to use contorted accounting to place themselves back in the same position they would have been in had the President not, in effect, interfered with the prospective economic advantage they thought they had in the Exchanges.

Neither this blog entry nor the video will address whether the proposed regulations are permissible as a matter of administrative law or separation of powers. Nor will I explore today whether the regulatory changes can be seen as a necessarily evil. Exposing what is actually going on here, however, must create some serious concerns for all concerned about the rule of law. When section 1342 of the Affordable Care Act (42 U.S.C. § 18062) speaks of “allowable costs,” one would initially think it referred to costs actually incurred by the insurer as a result of running its program. Those costs might be paying claims, paying the electric bill, marketing costs and, perhaps, some reasonable allowance for profit — such as the 3% of after tax premiums actually placed in the original regulations.

But it is going to take some work to show that, by “allowable costs,” the statute meant costs that the insurer did not actually incur in running its program. The burden will be even higher due to the fact that the proposed regulations apparently contemplate varying this heightened profit allowance from state to state. This will be done not in response to different rates of return on capital in the different states, but only to take account of differential losses to insurers caused by different state responses to President Obama’s about-face on whether certain plans that violate ACA requirements could continue to be sold outside of the Exchanges.

In short, the increase in “profit” sure looks like a book-keeping entry whose sole purpose has nothing to do with anything in the statute but is instead designed to restore the insurer to the position it would have been in had federal policy not changed. It is as if the insurers are being given some sort of entitlement to the profits they would otherwise have made and the administration is looking for any term in the statute not glued down (such as an 80% reimbursement rate on certain losses) in order to accomplish this goal.

Fleshing out  more fully these matters of statutory interpretation, separation of powers, and administrative law will be left for later, however, along with a fuller explanation of what is going on inside the Risk Corridor Calculator that I created. For now, play with the spreadsheet and enjoy the video.

Resources

Society of Actuaries, Health Watch: Risk Corridors under the Affordable Care Act — A Bridge over Troubled Waters, but the Devil’s in the Details

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